Suzie Cellars - From Our Cellar To Yours!
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tidbits from the cellar
tidbits from the cellar
tidbits from the cellar
tidbits from the cellar
tidbits from the cellar

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tidbits from the cellar
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tidbits from the cellar

Poor soil quality tends to produce better wines. The trick is to "challenge" the vines by making them "work" harder. A toast to hard work! Take a sip...Suzie

tidbits from the cellar

Burgundy for kings, champagne for duchesses, claret for gentlemen. 
~Anon French Proverb. I think I would add Rombauer Chard for soccer moms! Take a sip...Suzie

tidbits from the cellar

People tend to make food and wine pairing more difficult then it needs to be. The easiest way to pair wine is to match the color! White wine goes with white foods and red wine goes with red foods! Think about it...it really is that simple! Most fish is white, hence white wine. But what about ahi?  Well, it's red and certainly will pair better with red wine. Pasta? Alfredo= white and bolognese= red. Pesto? Flip a coin? Just kidding....I would stick with white. Any wine pairing thoughts? Let me know! Take a sip...Suzie

tidbits from the cellar

β€œIn victory, you deserve Champagne, in defeat, you need it.” – Napoleon Bonaparte. Work for me! Take a sip...Suzie

tidbits from the cellar

More than 90% of all wine produced in the United States is produced in California. California also ranks first in wine consumption. Nearly one in five (18 percent) of the bottles consumed in the United States is consumed by Californians. If California were a nation, it would be the fourth leading wine-producing country in the world behind France, Italy and Spain. Lets hear it for the Golden State! What wines are you drinking my Californian friends? Take a sip...Suzie

tidbits from the cellar

Wine is a journey. Most people start with a very light white, like a pinot grigio or Sauv blanc, and progress to heavier whites like chardonnay. The next step is lighter reds and eventually progressing to the big daddies, being bordeaux, big california cabs, or even an Italian Super Tuscan. Everyone's wine journey will be different. Some drinkers only go as far as the "lighter" whites. Others will go all the way to the big daddy wines. Wherever you are on your journey is a celebration! As I always say "drink what you like and like what you drink"! As promised, the best red wines for beginners. A great start is a shiraz/syrah. A syrah is "jammy" meaning it's full tasting with some sweetness. Another good choice is a pinot noir. A pinot is lighter and a great wine to blend with a wide variety of foods. Remember, Burgundies are Pinot Noir grapes! And last but not least Carmenere. Carmenere is the Grandpa to Cabernet. There are great Carmenere coming out of Chile at a great price. A toast to your wine journey! Take a sip...Suzie

tidbits from the cellar

As wine drinkers, our taste for wine evolves. Most people don't start out drinking big cabs or bordeaux. So, what are the best wines for a novice to begin with? For whites, a good start would be pinot grigio, which is dry and not sweet. The best pinot grigio come from Italy. Another would be Vinho Verde which is from Portugal. My last pick is Sauvignon Blanc. Sauv Bancs are VERY different depending on the region they're from. A New Zealand sauv blanc will be very citrusy with a lot of Kiwi flavor, go figure! American Sauv Blancs are not as distinctive. Serve all of these wines well chilled. Tomorrow....red wines! Take a sip...Suzie

tidbits from the cellar

One Bottle of wine contains: 
  • 750 ml of liquid
  • 2.4 pounds of grapes (39 oz.)
  • 25.6 ounces of wine (4/5 quart)
  • 4 glasses of wine
Take a sip...Suzie

tidbits from the cellar

Red wine, typically more than white wine, has antioxidant properties and contains resveratrol, which seems to be important in the cardio-protective effects of wine. Take a sip...to your heart! Suzie

tidbits from the cellar

Red wines are red because fermentation extracts color from the grape skins. White wines are not fermented with the skins present. Hmmmm....so white would be red if it had skin and red would be white without skins? I think I'll have to ponder the thought over a glass of wine! Take a sip...Suzie
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